The Cameo

The Cameo

PROGRAM Historic Restoration

SIZE 3,500 sf

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Originally opened as a single-screen movie house in 1940, Orlando’s Cameo Theater functioned for only several years until eventually closing after World War II.  Shortly thereafter IBM renovated the structure by inserting a second floor in the open space of the interior to create office space.  Since then, a series of uses ranging from office, a live music venue and a church have occupied this address.  Coupled with neglect, each one of these uses made subtle modifications to the façade which eventually diluted the memory of what once occupied this site.  In 2012 the architect and new owner formulated a plan to take advantage of a City of Orlando façade improvement grant program which would provide funds to restore the façade in addition to the original lighted icon at the building’s parapet.  With the award of these funds the memory of the Cameo Theater has been restored with a renewed presence on East Colonial Drive just north of Downtown Orlando.  Restoration of remaining late-deco architectural details in addition to the recreation of the iconic sign have reestablished this address as a contributing structure to Orlando’s pre and post-war aesthetic.

The large open plan of the ground floor has become home to one of Orlando’s premier cultural attractions, Snap! Orlando, featuring renown photographers from all over the world.  With a large storefront presence, the gallery at the ground floor, flanking courtyard and back alley have become charged urban spaces previously forsaken and underutilized.  The second floor functions as office space.

News of the owner’s and architect’s research into the building’s history made the local papers which inspired several members of the community to assist in locating original photography of the building façade; something that was thought to be lost with time.  When images located revealed the original icon at the top of the parapet, the design team moved forward in earnest with the City’s support.

This series of events established a timeline for the life of this forgotten structure and a story which captivated the local community.

As a result of a well-publicized and inclusive process of research and design, The Cameo Theater serves as an embodiment of how community engagement can embrace architectural process and sustain good design by revealing the compelling story of a relevant structure.

 

The Cameo

The Cameo

PROGRAM Historic Restoration

SIZE 3,500 sf

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Originally opened as a single-screen movie house in 1940, Orlando’s Cameo Theater functioned for only several years until eventually closing after World War II.  Shortly thereafter IBM renovated the structure by inserting a second floor in the open space of the interior to create office space.  Since then, a series of uses ranging from office, a live music venue and a church have occupied this address.  Coupled with neglect, each one of these uses made subtle modifications to the façade which eventually diluted the memory of what once occupied this site.  In 2012 the architect and new owner formulated a plan to take advantage of a City of Orlando façade improvement grant program which would provide funds to restore the façade in addition to the original lighted icon at the building’s parapet.  With the award of these funds the memory of the Cameo Theater has been restored with a renewed presence on East Colonial Drive just north of Downtown Orlando.  Restoration of remaining late-deco architectural details in addition to the recreation of the iconic sign have reestablished this address as a contributing structure to Orlando’s pre and post-war aesthetic.

The large open plan of the ground floor has become home to one of Orlando’s premier cultural attractions, Snap! Orlando, featuring renown photographers from all over the world.  With a large storefront presence, the gallery at the ground floor, flanking courtyard and back alley have become charged urban spaces previously forsaken and underutilized.  The second floor functions as office space.

News of the owner’s and architect’s research into the building’s history made the local papers which inspired several members of the community to assist in locating original photography of the building façade; something that was thought to be lost with time.  When images located revealed the original icon at the top of the parapet, the design team moved forward in earnest with the City’s support.

This series of events established a timeline for the life of this forgotten structure and a story which captivated the local community.

As a result of a well-publicized and inclusive process of research and design, The Cameo Theater serves as an embodiment of how community engagement can embrace architectural process and sustain good design by revealing the compelling story of a relevant structure.

The Cameo

The Cameo

PROGRAM Historic Restoration

SIZE 3,500 sf

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Originally opened as a single-screen movie house in 1940, Orlando’s Cameo Theater functioned for only several years until eventually closing after World War II.  Shortly thereafter IBM renovated the structure by inserting a second floor in the open space of the interior to create office space.  Since then, a series of uses ranging from office, a live music venue and a church have occupied this address.  Coupled with neglect, each one of these uses made subtle modifications to the façade which eventually diluted the memory of what once occupied this site.  In 2012 the architect and new owner formulated a plan to take advantage of a City of Orlando façade improvement grant program which would provide funds to restore the façade in addition to the original lighted icon at the building’s parapet.  With the award of these funds the memory of the Cameo Theater has been restored with a renewed presence on East Colonial Drive just north of Downtown Orlando.  Restoration of remaining late-deco architectural details in addition to the recreation of the iconic sign have reestablished this address as a contributing structure to Orlando’s pre and post-war aesthetic.

The large open plan of the ground floor has become home to one of Orlando’s premier cultural attractions, Snap! Orlando, featuring renown photographers from all over the world.  With a large storefront presence, the gallery at the ground floor, flanking courtyard and back alley have become charged urban spaces previously forsaken and underutilized.  The second floor functions as office space.

News of the owner’s and architect’s research into the building’s history made the local papers which inspired several members of the community to assist in locating original photography of the building façade; something that was thought to be lost with time.  When images located revealed the original icon at the top of the parapet, the design team moved forward in earnest with the City’s support.

This series of events established a timeline for the life of this forgotten structure and a story which captivated the local community.

As a result of a well-publicized and inclusive process of research and design, The Cameo Theater serves as an embodiment of how community engagement can embrace architectural process and sustain good design by revealing the compelling story of a relevant structure.

The Cameo

The Cameo

PROGRAM Historic Restoration

SIZE 3,500 sf

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Originally opened as a single-screen movie house in 1940, Orlando’s Cameo Theater functioned for only several years until eventually closing after World War II.  Shortly thereafter IBM renovated the structure by inserting a second floor in the open space of the interior to create office space.  Since then, a series of uses ranging from office, a live music venue and a church have occupied this address.  Coupled with neglect, each one of these uses made subtle modifications to the façade which eventually diluted the memory of what once occupied this site.  In 2012 the architect and new owner formulated a plan to take advantage of a City of Orlando façade improvement grant program which would provide funds to restore the façade in addition to the original lighted icon at the building’s parapet.  With the award of these funds the memory of the Cameo Theater has been restored with a renewed presence on East Colonial Drive just north of Downtown Orlando.  Restoration of remaining late-deco architectural details in addition to the recreation of the iconic sign have reestablished this address as a contributing structure to Orlando’s pre and post-war aesthetic.

The large open plan of the ground floor has become home to one of Orlando’s premier cultural attractions, Snap! Orlando, featuring renown photographers from all over the world.  With a large storefront presence, the gallery at the ground floor, flanking courtyard and back alley have become charged urban spaces previously forsaken and underutilized.  The second floor functions as office space.

News of the owner’s and architect’s research into the building’s history made the local papers which inspired several members of the community to assist in locating original photography of the building façade; something that was thought to be lost with time.  When images located revealed the original icon at the top of the parapet, the design team moved forward in earnest with the City’s support.

This series of events established a timeline for the life of this forgotten structure and a story which captivated the local community.

As a result of a well-publicized and inclusive process of research and design, The Cameo Theater serves as an embodiment of how community engagement can embrace architectural process and sustain good design by revealing the compelling story of a relevant structure.

The Cameo

The Cameo

PROGRAM Historic Restoration

SIZE 3,500 sf

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Originally opened as a single-screen movie house in 1940, Orlando’s Cameo Theater functioned for only several years until eventually closing after World War II.  Shortly thereafter IBM renovated the structure by inserting a second floor in the open space of the interior to create office space.  Since then, a series of uses ranging from office, a live music venue and a church have occupied this address.  Coupled with neglect, each one of these uses made subtle modifications to the façade which eventually diluted the memory of what once occupied this site.  In 2012 the architect and new owner formulated a plan to take advantage of a City of Orlando façade improvement grant program which would provide funds to restore the façade in addition to the original lighted icon at the building’s parapet.  With the award of these funds the memory of the Cameo Theater has been restored with a renewed presence on East Colonial Drive just north of Downtown Orlando.  Restoration of remaining late-deco architectural details in addition to the recreation of the iconic sign have reestablished this address as a contributing structure to Orlando’s pre and post-war aesthetic.

The large open plan of the ground floor has become home to one of Orlando’s premier cultural attractions, Snap! Orlando, featuring renown photographers from all over the world.  With a large storefront presence, the gallery at the ground floor, flanking courtyard and back alley have become charged urban spaces previously forsaken and underutilized.  The second floor functions as office space.

News of the owner’s and architect’s research into the building’s history made the local papers which inspired several members of the community to assist in locating original photography of the building façade; something that was thought to be lost with time.  When images located revealed the original icon at the top of the parapet, the design team moved forward in earnest with the City’s support.

This series of events established a timeline for the life of this forgotten structure and a story which captivated the local community.

As a result of a well-publicized and inclusive process of research and design, The Cameo Theater serves as an embodiment of how community engagement can embrace architectural process and sustain good design by revealing the compelling story of a relevant structure.