728 North Thornton

728 North Thornton

PROGRAM Commercial Office / Retail

SIZE 4,500 + site redevelopment

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Located on North Thornton Avenue this project is a speculative office/retail/restaurant structure designed to realize value from and reinvigorate an existing 60-space surface parking lot. The North Thornton Avenue site sits among a number of other underutilized and neglected parking areas serving businesses fronting major arterial roads within the Mills 50 Main Street District near downtown Orlando, Florida. The architectural team envisioned a scheme which would activate the street frontage and maximize the revenue opportunity of the commercial property. 

The 4,500-square foot masonry-and-steel structure is set back from the city sidewalk to reinforce a strong storefront presence and reactivate pedestrian access. Tenant space is defined by a clear expression of structure articulating an economy of form and construction. The sweeping gesture of the roof captures the space of the sidewalk with a translucent solar canopy comprised of frameless, glass photovoltaic panels which power site lighting in the evening.

The interior of the structure is divided into three separate office and/or retail spaces. The multi-purpose areas at the front of the building are backed by private offices, mechanical areas, and functional spaces for employees. The wrap-around glass façade illuminates the interior with natural light and optimizes retail visibility along the busy commercial avenue. The rear of the building is comprised of exposed concrete block for utility and ease of maintenance.

The area surrounding the building is reconfigured to maximize the efficiency of vehicle parking and to create a safe environment for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Thirty parking spaces are intermingled with discrete green pockets to introduce trees and landscaping to the site. On the street, a “Bike-Share Station,” is set between two parallel-parking spaces, encouraging more diverse methods of transportation in the neighborhood. An existing single-tenant retail space located at the northwest corner of the site-- previously renovated by the same architect--works in tandem with the scale of the new development by forming an active enclave in what was previously forsaken space. 

The value-added approach administered by the design team in collaboration with the developer results in a solution which elevates the revenue potential of a previously underutilized site. The overall design economically embraces the existing urban landscape, provides for increased pedestrian visits, and accommodates customer’s cars in a reworked site plan. Activating infill spaces with optimally-scaled development increases the relevance of underused properties and contributes to the ongoing urban renaissance of the Mills 50 Main Street District.

728 North Thornton

728 North Thornton

PROGRAM Commercial Office / Retail

SIZE 4,500 + site redevelopment

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Located on North Thornton Avenue this project is a speculative office/retail/restaurant structure designed to realize value from and reinvigorate an existing 60-space surface parking lot. The North Thornton Avenue site sits among a number of other underutilized and neglected parking areas serving businesses fronting major arterial roads within the Mills 50 Main Street District near downtown Orlando, Florida. The architectural team envisioned a scheme which would activate the street frontage and maximize the revenue opportunity of the commercial property. 

The 4,500-square foot masonry-and-steel structure is set back from the city sidewalk to reinforce a strong storefront presence and reactivate pedestrian access. Tenant space is defined by a clear expression of structure articulating an economy of form and construction. The sweeping gesture of the roof captures the space of the sidewalk with a translucent solar canopy comprised of frameless, glass photovoltaic panels which power site lighting in the evening.

The interior of the structure is divided into three separate office and/or retail spaces. The multi-purpose areas at the front of the building are backed by private offices, mechanical areas, and functional spaces for employees. The wrap-around glass façade illuminates the interior with natural light and optimizes retail visibility along the busy commercial avenue. The rear of the building is comprised of exposed concrete block for utility and ease of maintenance.

The area surrounding the building is reconfigured to maximize the efficiency of vehicle parking and to create a safe environment for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Thirty parking spaces are intermingled with discrete green pockets to introduce trees and landscaping to the site. On the street, a “Bike-Share Station,” is set between two parallel-parking spaces, encouraging more diverse methods of transportation in the neighborhood. An existing single-tenant retail space located at the northwest corner of the site-- previously renovated by the same architect--works in tandem with the scale of the new development by forming an active enclave in what was previously forsaken space. 

The value-added approach administered by the design team in collaboration with the developer results in a solution which elevates the revenue potential of a previously underutilized site. The overall design economically embraces the existing urban landscape, provides for increased pedestrian visits, and accommodates customer’s cars in a reworked site plan. Activating infill spaces with optimally-scaled development increases the relevance of underused properties and contributes to the ongoing urban renaissance of the Mills 50 Main Street District.

728 North Thornton

728 North Thornton

PROGRAM Commercial Office / Retail

SIZE 4,500 + site redevelopment

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Located on North Thornton Avenue this project is a speculative office/retail/restaurant structure designed to realize value from and reinvigorate an existing 60-space surface parking lot. The North Thornton Avenue site sits among a number of other underutilized and neglected parking areas serving businesses fronting major arterial roads within the Mills 50 Main Street District near downtown Orlando, Florida. The architectural team envisioned a scheme which would activate the street frontage and maximize the revenue opportunity of the commercial property. 

The 4,500-square foot masonry-and-steel structure is set back from the city sidewalk to reinforce a strong storefront presence and reactivate pedestrian access. Tenant space is defined by a clear expression of structure articulating an economy of form and construction. The sweeping gesture of the roof captures the space of the sidewalk with a translucent solar canopy comprised of frameless, glass photovoltaic panels which power site lighting in the evening.

The interior of the structure is divided into three separate office and/or retail spaces. The multi-purpose areas at the front of the building are backed by private offices, mechanical areas, and functional spaces for employees. The wrap-around glass façade illuminates the interior with natural light and optimizes retail visibility along the busy commercial avenue. The rear of the building is comprised of exposed concrete block for utility and ease of maintenance.

The area surrounding the building is reconfigured to maximize the efficiency of vehicle parking and to create a safe environment for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Thirty parking spaces are intermingled with discrete green pockets to introduce trees and landscaping to the site. On the street, a “Bike-Share Station,” is set between two parallel-parking spaces, encouraging more diverse methods of transportation in the neighborhood. An existing single-tenant retail space located at the northwest corner of the site-- previously renovated by the same architect--works in tandem with the scale of the new development by forming an active enclave in what was previously forsaken space. 

The value-added approach administered by the design team in collaboration with the developer results in a solution which elevates the revenue potential of a previously underutilized site. The overall design economically embraces the existing urban landscape, provides for increased pedestrian visits, and accommodates customer’s cars in a reworked site plan. Activating infill spaces with optimally-scaled development increases the relevance of underused properties and contributes to the ongoing urban renaissance of the Mills 50 Main Street District.

728 North Thornton

728 North Thornton

PROGRAM Commercial Office / Retail

SIZE 4,500 + site redevelopment

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Located on North Thornton Avenue this project is a speculative office/retail/restaurant structure designed to realize value from and reinvigorate an existing 60-space surface parking lot. The North Thornton Avenue site sits among a number of other underutilized and neglected parking areas serving businesses fronting major arterial roads within the Mills 50 Main Street District near downtown Orlando, Florida. The architectural team envisioned a scheme which would activate the street frontage and maximize the revenue opportunity of the commercial property. 

The 4,500-square foot masonry-and-steel structure is set back from the city sidewalk to reinforce a strong storefront presence and reactivate pedestrian access. Tenant space is defined by a clear expression of structure articulating an economy of form and construction. The sweeping gesture of the roof captures the space of the sidewalk with a translucent solar canopy comprised of frameless, glass photovoltaic panels which power site lighting in the evening.

The interior of the structure is divided into three separate office and/or retail spaces. The multi-purpose areas at the front of the building are backed by private offices, mechanical areas, and functional spaces for employees. The wrap-around glass façade illuminates the interior with natural light and optimizes retail visibility along the busy commercial avenue. The rear of the building is comprised of exposed concrete block for utility and ease of maintenance.

The area surrounding the building is reconfigured to maximize the efficiency of vehicle parking and to create a safe environment for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Thirty parking spaces are intermingled with discrete green pockets to introduce trees and landscaping to the site. On the street, a “Bike-Share Station,” is set between two parallel-parking spaces, encouraging more diverse methods of transportation in the neighborhood. An existing single-tenant retail space located at the northwest corner of the site-- previously renovated by the same architect--works in tandem with the scale of the new development by forming an active enclave in what was previously forsaken space. 

The value-added approach administered by the design team in collaboration with the developer results in a solution which elevates the revenue potential of a previously underutilized site. The overall design economically embraces the existing urban landscape, provides for increased pedestrian visits, and accommodates customer’s cars in a reworked site plan. Activating infill spaces with optimally-scaled development increases the relevance of underused properties and contributes to the ongoing urban renaissance of the Mills 50 Main Street District.

728 North Thornton

728 North Thornton

PROGRAM Commercial Office / Retail

SIZE 4,500 + site redevelopment

LOCATION Orlando, FL

DESIGN

Located on North Thornton Avenue this project is a speculative office/retail/restaurant structure designed to realize value from and reinvigorate an existing 60-space surface parking lot. The North Thornton Avenue site sits among a number of other underutilized and neglected parking areas serving businesses fronting major arterial roads within the Mills 50 Main Street District near downtown Orlando, Florida. The architectural team envisioned a scheme which would activate the street frontage and maximize the revenue opportunity of the commercial property. 

The 4,500-square foot masonry-and-steel structure is set back from the city sidewalk to reinforce a strong storefront presence and reactivate pedestrian access. Tenant space is defined by a clear expression of structure articulating an economy of form and construction. The sweeping gesture of the roof captures the space of the sidewalk with a translucent solar canopy comprised of frameless, glass photovoltaic panels which power site lighting in the evening.

The interior of the structure is divided into three separate office and/or retail spaces. The multi-purpose areas at the front of the building are backed by private offices, mechanical areas, and functional spaces for employees. The wrap-around glass façade illuminates the interior with natural light and optimizes retail visibility along the busy commercial avenue. The rear of the building is comprised of exposed concrete block for utility and ease of maintenance.

The area surrounding the building is reconfigured to maximize the efficiency of vehicle parking and to create a safe environment for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Thirty parking spaces are intermingled with discrete green pockets to introduce trees and landscaping to the site. On the street, a “Bike-Share Station,” is set between two parallel-parking spaces, encouraging more diverse methods of transportation in the neighborhood. An existing single-tenant retail space located at the northwest corner of the site-- previously renovated by the same architect--works in tandem with the scale of the new development by forming an active enclave in what was previously forsaken space. 

The value-added approach administered by the design team in collaboration with the developer results in a solution which elevates the revenue potential of a previously underutilized site. The overall design economically embraces the existing urban landscape, provides for increased pedestrian visits, and accommodates customer’s cars in a reworked site plan. Activating infill spaces with optimally-scaled development increases the relevance of underused properties and contributes to the ongoing urban renaissance of the Mills 50 Main Street District.